Slow posting for RDG for a while…

My long time followers might remember the Japanese test I took last year called the JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test). It’s a long, standardized test that certifies your Japanese level. It’s broken up into 5 levels and passing the higher levels can help you get jobs that require Japanese. Last year, I passed N3, the middle level test. This year, I’m going to be trying for N2.

At this point, it might be a bit of a stretch. I’ve been studying, but not nearly as well as I should have. Living in Japan obviously helps a lot, but if you’re not actively studying and using what you learn, it can only bring you so far. The test is in 3 months, so I still have time to turn things around and give myself a chance. But to do that, I really need to buckle down.

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Rainy day on the top of a mountain

Rainy day on the top of a mountain

Japanese Learning Resources!

similarjapanesewords:

Grammar:

Kanji:

Listening:

Vocab:

Other:

This is a basic list to help you get started! I use mostly apps from the android store on my tablet, or I use books (my books are currently in boxes that I have yet to unpack after moving out of my dorm.) If you need anything else added to the list, or want a list of my books once their unpacked, let me know!

(via booksandthesea)

Red Data Girl: The First Familiar (Week 17)

Red Data Girl: The First Familiar
By Noriko Ogiwara

A Translation

Miss the last piece? Read it here!

Things are starting to get crazy! Enjoy!

Notes on this week’s translation:

  1. I considered writing a comment about this in the last piece, but then I decided against it because I wasn’t sure how I would explain it. It’s just so weird to be translating it though that I still feel like I should comment on it, so that’s what I’m doing now. In the last piece, Miyuki reads most of Yukariko’s address off the email she sent them. You may not have even noticed that’s what it was because Japanese addresses are set up so differently than they are in the US and a lot of other countries. Basically, there isn’t a street and house number. Instead, towns/cities/etc are cut into small areas of blocks called wards. Yukariko lives in the Nagano ward. Those wards are then cut into smaller areas and numbered. Yukariko lives in Nagano 2. From there, each house gets a set of numbers to describe its position in that specific area. (Yukariko’s number isn’t mentioned in the book.) This set up can make it hard to find buildings if you aren’t familiar area you’re going. However, it’s necessary seeing as in general, only major roads are named in Japan. Instead, they name intersections. So, when you give someone directions in Japan, you have a number of ways to tell people how to get from Point A to B but it usually doesn’t include street names.
  2. In this piece, you will encounter two bolded sentences. These are large blocks of chanting in the book that I could not have even dreamed of translating. But don’t worry. You’re not losing any important information by not reading the chant. They seemed to be mostly a stream of unrelated words and phrases, most likely in classical Japanese. All you need to know is that it’s being said.

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Good morning, all.
I just woke up to this lovely surprise. 900 followers! Wow! Thank you! :D

Good morning, all.

I just woke up to this lovely surprise. 900 followers! Wow! Thank you! :D

nihon-no-ningyou:

A silk-faced oiran doll. Oiran were Edo Period courtesans (and unfortunately, often indentured servants from impoverished families) who were trained in traditional Japanese arts, such as playing koto (a harp-like Japanese instrument), calligraphy, and the tea ceremony. They dressed in colorful, multilayered kimonos, brocade obis tied in front, and elaborate hairstyles with numerous hair ornaments. The most successful oiran were regarded as celebrities and were often the subjects of woodblock prints.

nihon-no-ningyou:

A silk-faced oiran doll. Oiran were Edo Period courtesans (and unfortunately, often indentured servants from impoverished families) who were trained in traditional Japanese arts, such as playing koto (a harp-like Japanese instrument), calligraphy, and the tea ceremony. They dressed in colorful, multilayered kimonos, brocade obis tied in front, and elaborate hairstyles with numerous hair ornaments. The most successful oiran were regarded as celebrities and were often the subjects of woodblock prints.

(via thekimonogallery)

Saw these fun guys on a day trip with my friends.

Gorgeous day in Japan

I took these about two months ago and they’ve just been sitting on my phone. ^^; Sorry!

Last night I went to a maid cafe for the first time!

I’ve always wanted to go to a maid cafe, but there’s a number of reasons I haven’t. I’m a little shy, I haven’t found friends to go with, they’re usually in major cities, you have to be careful because some of them are a little sketchy, etc.

Anyway, one opened in my little city this month. I’ve been curious about it, but once again, I’m too shy to go alone, etc. Also, seeing as it’s in my city, I didn’t know how I felt about the chances that one of my students might see me going in. I know it sounds like I’m being paranoid, seeing as I live in a city, but it’s a very small city and things tend to get around quickly. You don’t know how many times I’ve heard “I saw you at the supermarket/mall/on the street/etc” from one of my students. Or even better is “My sister/brother/mother/grandma saw you at the supermarket/mall/bookstore/etc.”

Last week though, I mentioned to some of my friends that a new place had opened up and they were really interested. They wanted to go and so did I, so after a little consideration, we went last night. I wasn’t entirely sure what to expect seeing as it was my first time. But the place was really relaxed. It wasn’t set up as a European cafe as I’ve heard some are. It looked like a normal restaurant inside except that it was decorated with all sorts of anime stuff.

The maids were really nice. One of them tried speaking a little English to us, which was fun. But mostly we talked about our favorite animes. One of the maids seemed to be into Sailor Moon so we talked about Crystal a bit and the new musical (she didn’t know about the musicals).

One of my friends and I ordered omurice. My other friend ordered a pizza. The maids drew pictures on our omurice, but for some reason, there was confusion with the pizza and they would only draw on it if you ordered a half pizza? It was strange. Anyway, my friend ordered a whole one, so they didn’t draw on it. But my other friend drew on it for her when she finished half of it.

It was really enjoyable and I’ll probably be back sometime. :D

Sorry I don’t have a picture of the other omurice at the moment, but I’ll get it soon. The maids drew Haro from Gundum.

Sometimes I wonder what my neighbor who lives above me thinks of me. We never really see each other, but he has to hear the amount of Sailor Moon music I listen to and occasionally sing to… badly.

Mr. Neighbor, If I woke you up with my over enthusiastic rendition of Moon Pride this morning (vocals only because I was trying to be quiet and wear my headphones… fail), I apologize.

こにちは!
I'm a 23 year old American girl living in Japan. I moved here a year ago through the JET Program. Follow my adventures as I live in first apartment, work at my first real job, and generally figure out how to be a grown up... in a foreign country.

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