nubbsgalore:

photos of sakurajima, the most active volcano in japan, by (click pic) takehito miyatake (previously featured) and martin rietze. volcanic storms can rival the intensity of massive supercell thunderstorms, but the source of the charge responsible for this phenomenon remains hotly debated.

in the kind of storm clouds that generate conventional lightning, ice particles and soft hail collide, building up positive and negative charges, respectively. they separate into layers, and the charge builds up until the electric field is high enough to trigger lightning.

but the specific mechanism by which particles of differing charges are separated in the ash cloud is still unknown. lightning has been observed between the eruption plume and the volcano right at the start of an eruption, suggesting that there are processes that occur inside the volcano to lead to charge separation.  

volcanic lightning could yield clues about the earth’s geological past, and could answer questions about the beginning of life on our planet. volcanic lightning could have been the essential spark that converted water, hydrogen, ammonia, and methane molecules present on a primeval earth into amino acids, the building blocks of life.

(see also: previous volcanology posts)

(via banarbra)

jpnys:

Kiyamachi, Kyoto, Japan木屋町通
Kiyamachi 木屋町通 by Wil and Lil on Flickr.

jpnys:

Kiyamachi, Kyoto, Japan木屋町通

Kiyamachi 木屋町通 by Wil and Lil on Flickr.

(via thekimonogallery)

My One Year Japan Anniversary!

Today is the one year anniversary of my arrival in Japan. Last year on July 28th, I arrived at Narita Airport in Tokyo.

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Red Data Girl: The First Familiar (Week 12)

Red Data Girl: The First Familiar
By Noriko Ogiwara

A Translation

Miss last week’s piece? Read it here!

We are officially half way through the book! This week’s piece goes to page 141. The half way page was 139. Woo!

Notes on this week’s translation:

  1. Miyuki is learning “old martial arts”. The word used in the book is kobudou. Kobudou, also known as koryu, refers to martial arts used before the Meiji era. Some of these arts, to name a few, include archery, staff work, and jujutsu. Read more about kobudou here.

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etherealvistas:

Shinto Torii.  Japan 2009 by dev deploy 

etherealvistas:

Shinto Torii.  Japan 2009 by dev deploy 

(via thekimonogallery)

Good news: The storm cooled the weather off enough for me to open all the windows.

Bad news: My kitchen window apparently isn’t as fixed as we thought it was. The leak’s back and it only took a ten minute storm to do it…

Flash storm!

I was on my way home from the library when I got caught in a surprise storm! It was a bit gray when I left the house, but I wasn’t expecting rain. When I left the library, it was sprinkling ever so slightly. No more than a minute later, it was pouring. Of course I hit every red light possible on my way home. But luckily that’s only two lights. I live close.

If possible, the rain got even worse once I got home. There was thunder and wind and all sorts of crazy weather… but the storm’s already over and I’ve been home for no more than 10 minutes. Heh. Clearly I chose a bad time to leave the library.

In other news, I found the moth from two days ago. It was hiding in my measuring spoons. I’ll need to clean those now. ^^;

The chores aren’t done yet, but the major ones are and it’s almost 32C (89.6F) in my apartment. Seeing as I’d rather not turn on the AC until the afternoon, I think it’s time to go to the library.

Uh, yeah. So I forgot to post this after going to the Tanabata Festival a few weeks ago.
Frozen, known as Ana to Yuki no Jyoou (Ana and the Snow Queen), is really, really popular here in Japan. Due to that, I wasn’t too surprised to see Frozen decorations at the festival (there were one or two stands selling Frozen merchandise too). However, I was surprised to see ones that seem sort of accidentally morbid…
The dolls are awesome! The way they were put on display is just a little unfortunate. ^^;;;;

Uh, yeah. So I forgot to post this after going to the Tanabata Festival a few weeks ago.

Frozen, known as Ana to Yuki no Jyoou (Ana and the Snow Queen), is really, really popular here in Japan. Due to that, I wasn’t too surprised to see Frozen decorations at the festival (there were one or two stands selling Frozen merchandise too). However, I was surprised to see ones that seem sort of accidentally morbid…

The dolls are awesome! The way they were put on display is just a little unfortunate. ^^;;;;

Conjugating Verbs: Past Tense う Verbs

Last week, we talked about past tense using る (ru) verbs. This week, let’s continue our look into the past tense with う (u) verbs.

For those who need a quick refresher, う verbs are verbs that end with a hiragana character containing the う(u) sound such as つ(tsu), く(ku), む(mu), ふ(fu).  Although る(ru) verbs have their own conjugation which we discussed last week, there are also some う verbs which end with る as well, so be careful. Some examples of this include,

かえる (kaeru)—to return/go (home)
かわる (kawaru)—to change
わかる  (wakaru)—to understand

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こにちは!
I'm a 22 year old American girl who has just moved to Japan through the JET Program. Follow my adventures as I settle into my first apartment, start my first real job, and generally figure out how to be a grown up... in a foreign country.

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